Authorities claim Missouri teacher videotaped students undressing

On behalf of The Marks Law Firm, L.L.C. posted in Internet Crime on Friday, July 6, 2012

The Internet is becoming increasingly prevalent in today’s world. These constant technological changes, updates and advancements have increased Missouri authorities’ focus on Internet crimes. There are new federal and state laws for them to enforce and, at times, they will aggressively enforce them to prove the laws’ importance and why they should not be violated.

A Missouri teacher was recently accused of videotaping children while they were removing their clothes for a shower. When authorities seized the man’s computer, they say he was in possession of child pornography. The Missouri Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force is the group that investigated the teacher.

The school district for which the 38-year-old male teacher works holds 13 educational camps each year. The teacher began working at one of the camps in 2005. Authorities believe that the videos were taken at the camps between 2008 and 2012.

In the case of Internet crimes and possession of child pornography, there are procedural laws that must be followed by investigators and police. Everyone has rights and it is important for the accused to ensure that those procedures have been followed. If an authority claims to have evidence that was obtained in a way that does not follow legal procedure, it can be thrown out at trial.

Federal criminal charges usually have more serious consequences than state charges. These consequences can include prison time, monetary fines and much more. However, the prosecution is required to prove its case beyond a reasonable doubt. A strong defense will show the judge or jury that there is doubt as to whether the accused committed the crime. Proving reasonable doubt can lead to a reduction or elimination of criminal charges.

 

Source: FOX 2, “7th Grade Teacher Accused Of Taping Students In Shower,” Joe Militzer and Jeff Bernthal, June 25, 2012